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AWAKE
magictransistor:

Shambhala Mandala. The Magic Kingdom. 1700s.
Shambhala or “bde ‘byung” in Tibetan, means “The source of happiness”. The Kingdom of Shambhala takes a central place in the Kalachakra teachings. Not only did the historical Shakyamuni Buddha teach the Kalachakra tantra at the request of King Suchandra of Shambhala, also the teachings are said to be preserved there. It is predicted that a few centuries from now, a spiritual revival of the world will come from Shambhala.
As can be seen on the image above, Shambhala is usually depicted as circular. Divided like a Dharma-Wheel, it spreads out between high mountains and contains many cities. In the center of the hub is the capital Kalapa. Several people, including the ones who brought the Kalachakra teachings into our world, are said to have traveled there, or have had visions of it. One of the visionaries alive these days is Khamtrul Rinpoche.
As His Holiness the Dalai Lama noted during the 1985 Kalachakra initiation in Bodhgaya, Shambhala is not an ordinary country: ”Although those with special affiliation may actually be able to go there through their karmic connection, nevertheless it is not a physical place that we can actually find. We can only say that it is a pure land, a pure land in the human realm. And unless one has the merit and the actual karmic association, one cannot actually arrive there.”

magictransistor:

Shambhala Mandala. The Magic Kingdom. 1700s.

Shambhala or “bde ‘byung” in Tibetan, means “The source of happiness”. The Kingdom of Shambhala takes a central place in the Kalachakra teachings. Not only did the historical Shakyamuni Buddha teach the Kalachakra tantra at the request of King Suchandra of Shambhala, also the teachings are said to be preserved there. It is predicted that a few centuries from now, a spiritual revival of the world will come from Shambhala.

As can be seen on the image above, Shambhala is usually depicted as circular. Divided like a Dharma-Wheel, it spreads out between high mountains and contains many cities. In the center of the hub is the capital Kalapa. Several people, including the ones who brought the Kalachakra teachings into our world, are said to have traveled there, or have had visions of it. One of the visionaries alive these days is Khamtrul Rinpoche.

As His Holiness the Dalai Lama noted during the 1985 Kalachakra initiation in Bodhgaya, Shambhala is not an ordinary country: ”Although those with special affiliation may actually be able to go there through their karmic connection, nevertheless it is not a physical place that we can actually find. We can only say that it is a pure land, a pure land in the human realm. And unless one has the merit and the actual karmic association, one cannot actually arrive there.”

(via superkintaro)


ideasunknown:

This is how the solar system is actually moving as it traverses the galaxy.

ideasunknown:

This is how the solar system is actually moving as it traverses the galaxy.

(via sclr)

(Source: aclevine51, via sclr)

Wallace Fitzgerald Beery (April 1, 1885 – April 15, 1949) was an American actor.[1] He is best known for his portrayal of Bill in Min and Bill opposite Marie Dressler, as Long John Silver in Treasure Island, as Pancho Villa in Viva Villa!, and his titular role in The Champ, for which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor. Beery appeared in some 250 movies over a 36-year span. He was the brother of actor Noah Beery, Sr. and uncle of actor Noah Beery, Jr.

Alexandra Mikhailovna Kollontai

Alexandra Mikhailovna Kollontai (RussianАлекса́ндра Миха́йловна Коллонта́й — née Domontovich, Домонто́вич) (March 31 [O.S. March 19] 1872 – March 9, 1952) was a RussianCommunist revolutionary, first as a member of the Mensheviks, then from 1914 on as a Bolshevik. In 1923, Kollontai was appointed Soviet Ambassador to Norway, the first woman in the world to hold such a post (Diana Abgar was earlier).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexandra_Kollontai

Bronisław Kasper Malinowski

Bronisław Kasper Malinowski /ˈbrɒnɨˌslɑːf ˈkæspər ˌmælɨˈnɒfski/ (Polish: [ˌmaliˈnɔfski]; 1884–1942) was a Polish[1] anthropologist, one of the most important 20th-century anthropologists.[2][3][4][5][6] He has been also referred to as a sociologist and ethnographer.[7][8]

Gravity’s Rainbow.Thomas Pynchon

Clair Patterson

Clair Cameron Patterson (June 2, 1922 – December 5, 1995) was a geochemist born in MitchellvilleIowaUnited States. He graduated from Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa, received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, and spent his entire professional career at the California Institute of Technology.

In collaboration with George Tilton, Patterson developed the uranium-lead dating method into lead-lead dating, and by using leadisotopic data from the Canyon Diablo meteorite, he calculated an age for the Earth of 4.55 billion years; a figure far more accurate than those that existed at the time and one that has remained largely unchanged since 1956.

Patterson had first encountered lead contamination in the late 1940s as a graduate student at the University of Chicago. His work on this led to a total re-evaluation of the growth in lead concentrations in the atmosphere and the human body from industrial causes and his subsequent campaigning was seminal in the banning of lead additives to gasoline and lead solder in food cans.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clair_Cameron_Patterson

Bahá’u’lláh

Bahá’u’lláh (/bɑːhɑːˈʊlə/; Arabic: بهاء الله‎, “Glory of God”; 12 November 1817 – 29 May 1892), born Mírzá Ḥusayn-`Alí Núrí (Persian: میرزا حسینعلی نوری‎), was the founder of the Bahá’í Faith. He claimed to be the prophetic fulfilment of Bábism, a 19th-century outgrowth of Shí‘ism,[1] but in a broader sense claimed to be a messenger from God referring to the fulfilment of the eschatological expectations of Islam, Christianity, and other major religions.[2]

Bahá’u’lláh taught that humanity is one single race and that the age has come for its unification in a global society. He taught that “there is only one God, that all of the world’s religions are from God, and that now is the time for humanity to recognize its oneness and unite.” [3] His claim to divine revelation resulted in persecution and imprisonment by the Persian and Ottoman authorities, and his eventual 24-year confinement in the prison city of `Akka, Palestine (present-day Israel), where he died. He wrote many religious works, most notably the Kitáb-i-Aqdas and the Kitáb-i-Íqán.

There are two known photographs of Bahá’u’lláh. Outside of pilgrimage, Bahá’ís prefer not to view his photo in public, or even to display it in their private homes. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bahá’u’lláh

Orosius

Paulus Orosius (/ˈpɔːləs ɔːˈroʊʒiəs/; born c. 375, died after 418)[1] — less often Paul Orosius in English — was a Gallaecian Christian priest, historian and theologian, a student of Augustine of Hippo. It is possible that he was born in Bracara Augusta (now Braga), then capital of the Roman province of Gallaecia.[2] Although there are some questions regarding his biography, such as his exact date of birth, it is known that he was a person of some prestige from a cultural point of view, as he had contact with the greatest figures of his time such as Saint Augustine of Hippo and Saint Jerome. In order to meet with them Orosius travelled to cities on the southern coast of the Mediterranean Sea, such as Hippo Regius and Alexandria.

These journeys defined his life and intellectual output. Orosius did not just discuss theological matters with Saint Augustine, in fact he also collaborated with him on the book City of God.[3] In addition, in 415 he was chosen to travel to Palestine in order to exchange information with other intellectuals. He was also able to participate in a Church Council meeting in Jerusalem on the same trip and he was entrusted with transporting the relics of Saint Stephen. The date of his death is also unclear, although it appears to have not been earlier than 418, when he finished one of his books, or later than 423.[4]

He wrote a total of three books, of which his most important is his Seven Books of History Against the Pagans (Historiarum Adversum Paganos Libri VII), considered to be one of the books with the greatest impact on historiography during the period between antiquity and the Middle Ages, as well as being one of the most important Hispanic books of all time. Part of its importance comes from the fact that the author shows his historiographical methodology. The book is a historical narration focussing on the pagan peoples from the earliest time up until the time Orosius was alive.[5]

Orosius was a highly influential figure both for the dissemination of information (History Against the Pagans was one of the main sources of information regarding Antiquity that was used up to the Renaissance) and for rationalising the study of history (his methodology greatly influenced later historians).[6][7] http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orosius